Lesbian fantasy crime book

Going Wild with this Lesbian Fantasy Crime Book

Lesbian Fantasy Crime Book Review of ‘Wild’ by Meghan O’Brien

I chose O’Brien’s ‘Wild’ continuing with my new year resolution to read more lesbian books out of my comfort zone. Thanks, Tere for the recommendation! I’m so glad I decided to finally take the plunge and read it. It’s true that it deals with a vicious serial killer and there are violence and some disturbing content which normally are triggers for me, but the author handles them with finesse.

Selene Rhodes is a reclusive designer who hides a secret, not only she can shift to any other animal shape but also every full moon she transforms into a werewolf without a human conscience. So, for her, any romantic involvement is ruled out. Forensic pathologist Eve Thomas is brilliant at her profession but unlucky in love. When she meets Selene, who helps her after an attack, they cannot help but feel strongly drawn to each other. But Selene keeps secrets and Eve cannot trust her. Can Selene open up to Eve and help her catch a dangerous serial killer?Read More »

Lesbian Crime Book

No Good Reason to not read this lesbian crime book

Lesbian Crime Book Review of ‘No Good Reason’ by Cari Hunter

 

Why didn’t anyone recommend this book to me? 😉 Ok, ok, several people did. I was too darn stubborn and wanted to save it for a rainy day. I may have to dive into the three and a half (there is a short story too) lesbian crime book series right away.

This is the story of Sanne Jensen, a British detective that stumbles upon a kidnapping victim, sending her department into a manhunt. The manhunt turns frantic as another victim is discovered. In the meantime, Sanne’s longtime friend, Dr. Meg Fielding helps her try to keep some sanity through the case while trying to figure out the state of their relationship.

Can the detectives beat the clock and save the other victim before it is too late?Read More »

A Perfect Book by Jae

Lesbian Book Review of ‘Perfect Rhythm’ by Jae

Alright, this one was a very good read.

Leo is a famous singer just finishing a world tour when she receives a call from her estranged mother. Her father has suffered a stroke and her presence is needed at home. Home is the small town in Missouri where she grew up but quickly left in order to pursue her singing career. It was also the place she never fit in and where her father was clearly disappointed on her choice of career as well as her sexual orientation. Leo meets Holly, her father’s nurse, when she makes it home and discovers her father’s condition has left him in need of full-time care. As Leo confronts her past, she strikes a friendship with hope for more with Holly. Only, she must make amends and gain Holly’s trust in the process.

This novel was the first one I’ve read that has had an asexual character. Read More »

A great start to a series

Lesbian Book Review of ‘The Sovereign of Psiere’ by K. Aten

5.00 Stars. I enjoyed every second of this. The book is as good as the cover is beautiful. As most people know I’m a huge Aten fan. I love her writing style and really appreciate that she writes in so many different genres. All of her books are completely different and I love that you never know what she might write about next. This book was on my list of most anticipated books of 2019, and I’m happy to say it didn’t disappoint. This is spec-fic at its best and I can’t wait to read more in this ‘Mystery of the Makers’ series.

This book is actually a mash-up of many different genres. It is action-adventure, romance, steampunk, fantasy, and even more, rolled into one. It has a bit of Indiana Jones meets Tomb Raider feel but with queens and kings in a steampunk-like society. It is just so well imagined and really different than any other book I have read before. The world building is great as Aten designed a complete society from a royal ruling family to creatures of the sea and air. It’s a great fantasy world and I can’t wait to learn more of its secrets.Read More »

Not Alone in praising Noyes

Review of ‘Alone’ by EJ Noyes

Uff, this one was intense!

I just need to start at the beginning of my experience reading this novel. Literally, as I read the first sentence, I smiled. Yep, happy sigh. First person POV, you have become my favorite. First person POV written by EJ Noyes, I love you! Ms. Noyes, at the risk of sounding like a lunatic to you (again), you singlehandedly are responsible for my first person POV obsession. Your first person POV is simply genius. I’ve read other books written in first person, but none that resonate with me like when written by this author.

Did I mention my smile right? Well, that’s the last time I did until later, later in the book. This is Celeste Thorne’s first-person POV recount of her participation on a psychological study. The goal is for her to endure four years in close to complete isolation from human contact. The story begins after the third year, when suddenly Olivia Soldano, a lost hiker, appears on the edge of the compound. Suddenly Celeste must readjust to this person who is simply everything she ever wanted. The problem is that after such isolation, Celeste’s feelings are in disarray and she struggles to determine what is real and what is part of an elaborate lie.Read More »

Review of ‘Alone’ by E.J. Noyes.

Celeste Thorne is taking part in a scientific experiment that involves solitary confinement for four years with a final prize of half a million dollars. More than three years into the study, she finds a woman lurking in the border of her compound. Olivia Soldano is beautiful, caring and enigmatic but her sole presence in the house breaks the rules of the experiment and ultimately, can Celeste trust her?

Oh well… E.J. Noyes cannot stop surprising her readers, can she? ‘Alone’ is a book hard to categorise: it’s a game of contrasts. It’s dark but also optimistic, it’s about solitude but features a couple, it’s unsettling but, at the same time, hopeful. If you are acquainted with Ms. Noyes’s work, you will recognise the imprints of her style that readers have learned to love. Her books are always written in first person usually from the point of view of a broken woman with her co-lead presented as a flawed but righteous rescuer. What I consider outstanding is that, despite this apparent repetition, the stories have very different settings (war zone, corporate world, sports and now a psychological experiment) that make them all very distinctive, original and, at the same time, realistic.Read More »