A different romantic premise

Lesbian Book Review of ‘Create a life to love’ by Erin Zak

This one was a bit hard to rate, parts of it I enjoyed, others not so much. It was much better than Zak’s debut book but not as good as ‘Breaking Down Her Walls’ in my opinion. I thought the premise was interesting and I like that this was a new idea that we have not really seen done before. With so many lesbian romances out there that is not easy to do. I just felt a few things didn’t come together all the way.

This book is told in first person, in the POV of three main characters; two adults and one teenager. I actually didn’t mind the multiple POV’s, I thought that Zak did a great job of giving all of the characters their own unique voice. Because of the different POV’s this book almost felt part young adult romance and part adult romance. Again, I actually liked that as both romances were sweet. The problem I had was there did not seem to be enough dialogue for my personal tastes. There was a lot of inner reflections and inner conflict, that I felt got repetitive after a while. I wanted the characters just to talk more and further the story that way.Read More »

Don’t fear to fall for this one

Lesbian Book Review of ‘Fear of falling’ by Georgia Beers.

Sophie James has been an internationally renowned singer since she was a teenager. When her lifelong manager dies, she finds herself lost and missing him like a father. As a substitute manager, Sophie’s record company sends Dana Landon who is resourceful, hard-working and gorgeous. As their attraction develops, Sophie has ideas to change her career which clashes with the recording company’s plans. Will Sophie and Dana be able to avoid conflict and have their happily ever after?

Georgia Beers is a consummated lesbian author whose work rarely disappoints and ‘Fear of falling’ is no exception. This is an entertaining and romantic lesbian love story based on the always winning formula of the celebrity falling for the girl next door (or the other way around). Ms. Beers fans will be happy to see the marks of her style: well-written dialogues, sizzling chemistry, the right amount of angst and a little bit of humour. The novel deals with different issues such as bereavement, family, coming out and the price of fame.Read More »

Review of ‘The Fall’ by Robin Alexander.

This was just fantastic. However, before I declare that, I have to admit a couple of things. I listened to this one since it was included in Audible’s Romance Package. Once upon a time, I started the audiobook but quit early on. I could not get through the first family dinner scene. I was so overwhelmed by, wait for it, the Italian family (too close to home folks) that I had to move on. Since then, I’ve read two other Alexander books and loved them. Also, I have listened to two books narrated by Lisa Cordileone and also loved them. So, here I was looking for my next audiobook when I bumped into ‘The Fall’ again. I will not lie. I struggled through that same dinner scene at the beginning. Then I realized I had listened to it before and I had a choice to make. Well, since now I’m older and wiser, I pushed through and I am so happy I did!

Noel Savino is a dentist only interested in casual relationships after failing at finding true love a few times. She meets town newcomer Sunny Chase, who has only done serious dating but is looking to change to casual in order to leave her dating rut. After agreeing to casual, Noel puts her foot down and wants to date Sunny for real. This after her niece, Harper, made her promise to stay away from Sunny. Meanwhile, Harper is a teenager struggling with finding her sexual identity after meeting Lydia, Sunny’s daughter. This book just becomes a family affair.

‘The Fall’ is really two stories in one. Yay! This is about Noel/Sunny and Harper/Lydia. They were both fantastic on their own but worked so well together. Noel and Sunny were great together and tackled adult issues. Harper and Lydia were sweet and were in charge of navigating the first love waters. Together they touched on family, parenting, dating guidelines and more. Ms. Alexander wrote so many hilarious scenes that I just volunteered to mown the lawn so I could continue to listen. I’m sure some neighbors are wondering why one needs to laugh out loud while doing such an ordinary chore. The thought behind a person being a dog or a cat in terms of dating…that was priceless. By the way, I am so a dog! Everyone needs to read this to understand, then we can discuss it!

The characters are likable and so entertaining. The ones that are less likable grow on you and end up making you laugh along. The dialog is spot-on but never fails to be outrageously funny. Now, what really pushed this one to 5 stars was the secondary and surprisingly endearing topics such as first love and even some thought-provoking ones such as homosexuality and church. All these were in the background but when the story hits the proverbial fan, it was wonderful to see the author skillfully take the story along these paths without outlandish behaviors. Everything in this book seemed over the top without actually being over the top. That was refreshing!

Overall, a sweet and hilarious story that will no doubt win Ms. Alexander new fans. 5 stars.

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Review of ‘Write your own script’ by A.L. Brooks.

3.75 Stars. I have read all of Brooks’ books except for ‘The Club‘ and found this book to be my favorite of hers. This is actually the second Hollywood romance I have read in a row and I’m happy to say this was much more up my alley. I think this will be widely enjoyed by romance fans.

There are quite a few great reviews out that give a good summary so I’m going to skip that. I want to go right into what I enjoyed about the book. The romantic relationship between the two mains, a writer and actress, is what makes this book shine. While the character might have jumped into bed quickly, the connection and intimacy are so well done it doesn’t matter. These two characters built a relationship from sex and it actually worked. The more their walls went down and the intimacy went up, their connection grew stronger. This is what I look for in good sex scenes, to see that connection strengthened and Brooks did a great job writing it.

I do have to admit I felt the book slowed a little for me during times when the mains were not together. Their connection is the star of the book so when it’s not front and certain I didn’t care for those parts as much. I also wanted to see a little more about what happened at the end. I wish a few filler middle parts were cut and the story extended, but this is a mild complaint.

If you like Hollywood romances, don’t pass this one up. If you like romance with a strong intimate connection, this one is for you. This one is worth the read and I’m excited to see where Brooks goes next.

An ARC was given to me for an honest review.

     

Review of ‘Not the marrying kind’ by Jae.

Ashley Gaines is a florist adamant to remain in the closet as she lives and works in a conservative small town. Her neighbour and bakery owner Sasha Peterson is a pansexual who likes to stay away from relationships. Living in a small place, they know each other but aren’t friends. When they are asked to help organising Leo and Holly’s wedding, they start sharing more time together and eventually realise that they are attracted to each other. But Ashley is determined to stay in the closet and Sasha isn’t the marrying kind anyway. Will they find their happily ever after?

This is book two of the ‘Fair Oaks’ series which started with ‘Perfect rhythm’. Even though this novel reads as standalone, many events refer to the previous book and it catches up with Leo and Holly’s relationship. Having said that, Ashley is not a likeable character in ‘Perfect rhythm’ so, if you read that first, it might take you long to warm to her in this new book.

To say that this is a slow-burn romance is an understatement as the author takes her time to develop both characters’ personalities and their budding relationship. This makes the story credible in redeeming Ashley’s hurtful actions of the past and in challenging Sasha’s assumptions about commitment. Even though Ashley’s self-inflicted repressed sexuality might feel alien to younger generations or people living in big cities, Jae’s description of the circumstances that force Ashley to remain in the closet will strike a chord with many readers. In this series, the author continues to challenge our views about sexuality by introducing a pansexual character, in addition to the asexual and non-binary characters that were featured in book one.

‘Not the marrying kind’ balances the above-mentioned serious issues of diverse sexual preferences and society’s pressure on LGBTQA+ individuals, with the sensual world of baking and flowers. The use of the hidden meaning of flowers and baking metaphors, in addition to a few playful scenes and wonderful slow-burn chemistry, introduces lightness and beauty to the story. As usual, Jae excels in bringing out the romance and depicting the characters’ intimacy with, for example, an excellent remake of a famous ‘Fried Green Tomatoes’ sequence plus a very steamy undressing scene. As a bonus, readers who enjoyed Jae’s ‘Damage control’ will have the chance to catch up with Grace and Lauren’s relationship.

Overall, an entertaining, sensual and fun slow-burn romance which raises deep issues of sexuality and coming out. 4.5 stars.

ARC provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

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Review of ‘Twice in a lifetime’ by Jodie Griffin.

Talia Wasserman is a widow with grown-up daughters who just got a job as a civilian assistant to Lieutenant Eve Pope, chief of Police Community Relations. Their chemistry is hard to ignore but boss-subordinate relationships are frown upon. To make matters worse, there is a criminal on the lose endangering female police officers. Can Talia find love twice in a lifetime and not lose her partner again?

‘Twice in a lifetime’ is an interracial romance with a small side of mystery. Kudos to the author to feature two women in their early fifties, both with grown-up children and a bisexual protagonist who is in a lesbian relationship for the first time. This provides a realistic view of a bisexual character who didn’t have to deal with homophobia before because she was married to a man.

The story is written in first person from the point of view of Talia which, in my opinion, restricts the development of the plot. As a result, the mystery part is very much on the side, because Talia isn’t involved in the criminal investigation. Most of the action, which is lead by Eve, is told by the author and not shown by the characters’ actions. Unfortunately, this takes the thrill off the story a bit. The second half of the book, however, is better paced and more enjoyable.

The dialogues are well written as the author builds the mains’ chemistry through their banter and witty remarks. The book could have done with more of these conversations. It’s refreshing to see that the mains talk about their disagreements in a mature way and the sources of conflict aren’t forced into the plot. Both characters present their feelings with clarity and maturity that comes from their life experience and is coherent with their ages.

The relationship between Talia and her two daughters is very credible and enjoyable to read. In my opinion, the author got the tone right for these relationships and the description of Jewish traditions and family life enriches the plot tremendously.

Overall, a good interracial romance with older characters, well-rounded secondary characters and a bit of action on the side. 3.5 stars.

ARC provided to me in exchange for an honest review.

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