Lesbian debut book

This Lesbian Debut Book will make you feel

Lesbian Debut Book Review of ‘The Song of the Sea’ by Jenn Alexander

4.50 Stars. This was an excellent lesbian debut book for Alexander. Alexander won this year’s Sandra Moran scholarship from GCLS’ Writing Academy. Anna Burke won this scholarship last year and with her highly rated and successful books Compass Rose and Thorn, I had high expectations that Alexander would continue in a similar vein. I’m happy to say that I was really impressed by this drama-romance. Not only can Alexander write, but she knows how to make a reader feel. Alexander now has my attention and I will be keeping my eye out for her future books.

A little over a year after losing her newborn son, Lisa feels stuck in her grief and depression. When she gets a phone call from her brother announcing his wife is having a baby, Lisa knows she has to run away to the one place she has ever felt some real solace, the ocean. Lisa decides a long stay at a small beach town where her Great Aunt still lives, might just be what she needs to get her life back on track. But when Lisa meets Rachel and her son Declan, her feelings for them shock her. What kind of relationship can she have with them when she is still grieving for her child?Read More »

A sweet, butch-femme romance.

Lesbian Book Review of ‘Playing with fire’ by Lesley Davis.

3.50 Stars. This is the third book in the ‘Playing’ series. I did enjoy it but I do have to admit it is my least favorite of the series. The first two books of the series are really entwined, but you could read this book on its own if you needed too. Personally, I would suggest reading at least book one first. The main characters of that book are secondary characters in this one. Again it’s not pivotal, but book one is the best book in the series and I do think reading this series in order would make it the most enjoyable.

Like all three books, this is another butch-femme romance, in a city that centers around the same group of friends. This book had a slight twist as it also had a 10+ year age-gap between the mains. All three books are very sweet and mostly feel-good romances, with very little angst. If you need some sweet uncomplicated romance, this series is a great choice.Read More »

Review of ‘Recipe for love’ by Aurora Rey.

New Yorker hotshot chef Drew Davis has a clear professional goal to become a restaurant head chef as soon as possible. She gets the opportunity she was waiting for in a farm-to-table establishment in upstate New York. Apart from the inconvenience of having to leave her beloved city life to move to a rural area, Drew has to deal with local farmer Hannah Little who is as beautiful as obstinate and isn’t impressed by the fancy city chef. As they are forced to work together to make the restaurant a success, they both discover many things in common and a brewing mutual attraction. But Drew is only in upstate New York temporarily and will be back to NYC at the first opportunity to advance her professional career, or is she?

This is a slow-burn romance which will be appreciated especially by gourmet readers. Food is at the forefront of the story, with a particular focus on farm-produced ingredients. A farm-to-table restaurant aims to source most of the ingredients from local food producers, an apparently simple concept which presents a few challenges. Ms. Rey describes thoroughly the hard work involved in farming, the diverse types of products and the different nature cycles. As these descriptions take a big part of the book, people interested in farming, food produce and sustainability will enjoy the story much better than the rest. I personally found that there was too much detail in these aspects that distracted me from the main story.

In this novel, Ms. Rey uses contrasts expertly: femme-butch, white-biracial, countryside-city, and even including a feminine farmer character, which seems contradictory in itself. But beyond these disparities, there is an ample common ground; the appreciation of good food, the importance of family and the search of long-lasting love. The romance part of the plot is well written, and the characters’ relationship is built slowly from a strong initial antagonism that eventually changes into attraction. The author gets the butch-femme dynamic spot-on, especially in the sex scenes which, nevertheless, present a hot role reversal. My main criticism is that the characters’ main conflict could have been solved much easier with better communication.

Overall, a good butch-femme romance which will be appreciated especially by gourmet readers. 3.5 stars.

ARC provided by the publisher and Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

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