Lesbian fantasy book

An Interesting Lesbian Fantasy Book

Lesbian Fantasy Book Review of ‘Endangered’ by Michelle Larkin

 

Aspen Wolfe is a Boston cop with a tragic past until adopted as a teenager. She meets Dr. Tora Madigan when taking a teen to the ER after a shift. Aloof and always serious, Tora and Aspen bump heads as the President of the United States declares war on the Shrouds (shapeshifters) living amongst humans. Suddenly, Aspen is thrown into uncertainty as she discovers she is not a human but a Shroud. Tora realizes Aspen is the most important Shroud in existence and the only one capable of saving them all. The two Shrouds must find a way to escape and make it to the sanctuary before they are hunted by the government. There, a new alliance is formed to fight back against the unjust war.

I’ve become a Larkin fan, even with her very short career. I was looking forward to this book since I enjoyed the previous two. They were action thrillers with some paranormal/fantasy in them. This one is definitely more on the fantasy realm. Unfortunately, I did not enjoy it as much as her other two. This one deserves two ratings in my opinion: the first two-thirds were a 5 star for me while the last part of the book limped along to a 3-star review. I believe the problem was rushing through some parts. This is clearly the first book in a series as the story has only partial closure. Ms. Larkin has left the main conflict out there to develop and I must say, she put herself in a difficult spot to achieve it. I will read the next book to find out.Read More »

A different romantic premise

Lesbian Book Review of ‘Create a life to love’ by Erin Zak

This one was a bit hard to rate, parts of it I enjoyed, others not so much. It was much better than Zak’s debut book but not as good as ‘Breaking Down Her Walls’ in my opinion. I thought the premise was interesting and I like that this was a new idea that we have not really seen done before. With so many lesbian romances out there that is not easy to do. I just felt a few things didn’t come together all the way.

This book is told in first person, in the POV of three main characters; two adults and one teenager. I actually didn’t mind the multiple POV’s, I thought that Zak did a great job of giving all of the characters their own unique voice. Because of the different POV’s this book almost felt part young adult romance and part adult romance. Again, I actually liked that as both romances were sweet. The problem I had was there did not seem to be enough dialogue for my personal tastes. There was a lot of inner reflections and inner conflict, that I felt got repetitive after a while. I wanted the characters just to talk more and further the story that way.Read More »

A sweet, butch-femme romance.

Lesbian Book Review of ‘Playing with fire’ by Lesley Davis.

3.50 Stars. This is the third book in the ‘Playing’ series. I did enjoy it but I do have to admit it is my least favorite of the series. The first two books of the series are really entwined, but you could read this book on its own if you needed too. Personally, I would suggest reading at least book one first. The main characters of that book are secondary characters in this one. Again it’s not pivotal, but book one is the best book in the series and I do think reading this series in order would make it the most enjoyable.

Like all three books, this is another butch-femme romance, in a city that centers around the same group of friends. This book had a slight twist as it also had a 10+ year age-gap between the mains. All three books are very sweet and mostly feel-good romances, with very little angst. If you need some sweet uncomplicated romance, this series is a great choice.Read More »

Not Alone in praising Noyes

Review of ‘Alone’ by EJ Noyes

Uff, this one was intense!

I just need to start at the beginning of my experience reading this novel. Literally, as I read the first sentence, I smiled. Yep, happy sigh. First person POV, you have become my favorite. First person POV written by EJ Noyes, I love you! Ms. Noyes, at the risk of sounding like a lunatic to you (again), you singlehandedly are responsible for my first person POV obsession. Your first person POV is simply genius. I’ve read other books written in first person, but none that resonate with me like when written by this author.

Did I mention my smile right? Well, that’s the last time I did until later, later in the book. This is Celeste Thorne’s first-person POV recount of her participation on a psychological study. The goal is for her to endure four years in close to complete isolation from human contact. The story begins after the third year, when suddenly Olivia Soldano, a lost hiker, appears on the edge of the compound. Suddenly Celeste must readjust to this person who is simply everything she ever wanted. The problem is that after such isolation, Celeste’s feelings are in disarray and she struggles to determine what is real and what is part of an elaborate lie.Read More »

In ‘The pet boutique’ the dog steals the show.

Review of ‘The pet boutique’ by Suzie Carr.

Taylor Henshaw is an accomplished bestselling author suffering from writer’s block. To help her find her writing mojo again, her editor sends her to work in a pet shop that needs serious building renovations. While working on the project, Taylor meets Lexie Tanner, an attractive photographer and pet shop manager. As the refurbishment project progresses, Taylor and Lexie explore their budding attraction, but Taylor is a complicated woman dealing with bereavement and unsolved issues from her past. Will they have a happily ever after?

This is a slow-burn romance with the background of a building renovation and a cute dog as a co-lead. ‘The pet boutique’ refurbishment progresses as Taylor rebuilds her life and heals her old wounds. Both women leads are multi-layered and believable, their chemistry is built slowly but surely with the help of Cashmere, the dog, who acts as a facilitator in their relationship. Ms. Carr knows how to bring a dog character to life, to showcase their bonding with humans, their ability to support their masters in times of need and to understand the heartbreak of losing a pet.Read More »

Review of ‘Alone’ by E.J. Noyes.

Celeste Thorne is taking part in a scientific experiment that involves solitary confinement for four years with a final prize of half a million dollars. More than three years into the study, she finds a woman lurking in the border of her compound. Olivia Soldano is beautiful, caring and enigmatic but her sole presence in the house breaks the rules of the experiment and ultimately, can Celeste trust her?

Oh well… E.J. Noyes cannot stop surprising her readers, can she? ‘Alone’ is a book hard to categorise: it’s a game of contrasts. It’s dark but also optimistic, it’s about solitude but features a couple, it’s unsettling but, at the same time, hopeful. If you are acquainted with Ms. Noyes’s work, you will recognise the imprints of her style that readers have learned to love. Her books are always written in first person usually from the point of view of a broken woman with her co-lead presented as a flawed but righteous rescuer. What I consider outstanding is that, despite this apparent repetition, the stories have very different settings (war zone, corporate world, sports and now a psychological experiment) that make them all very distinctive, original and, at the same time, realistic.Read More »