A sweet, butch-femme romance.

Lesbian Book Review of ‘Playing with fire’ by Lesley Davis.

3.50 Stars. This is the third book in the ‘Playing’ series. I did enjoy it but I do have to admit it is my least favorite of the series. The first two books of the series are really entwined, but you could read this book on its own if you needed too. Personally, I would suggest reading at least book one first. The main characters of that book are secondary characters in this one. Again it’s not pivotal, but book one is the best book in the series and I do think reading this series in order would make it the most enjoyable.

Like all three books, this is another butch-femme romance, in a city that centers around the same group of friends. This book had a slight twist as it also had a 10+ year age-gap between the mains. All three books are very sweet and mostly feel-good romances, with very little angst. If you need some sweet uncomplicated romance, this series is a great choice.Read More »

Legally lesbian.

Review of ‘Practice makes perfect’ by Carsen Taite.

This is book 1 of ‘Legal affairs’, the new series by Carsen Taite which follows a group of three friends, Campbell, Abby, and Grace, partners in a boutique law firm in Austin. Ms. Taite is well known for her legal thrillers and books in which law issues are at the forefront but, according to the author, this series will be light on the legal side. ‘Practice makes perfect’ focuses on Campbell’s story.

Campbell Clark is an accomplished lawyer on her way to making partner in a big law firm. As she is tired of working for others, she decides to be her own boss and open her own firm with two besties from law school, Abby and Grace. Their chance to land a big client appears in the shape of a billion-worth internet startup facing a crucial demand. In order to win the client over she’ll have to compete with Wynne Garrity, associate lawyer of a big law firm. Wynne seems uptight and all work and no play, but as they get to know each other, their romantic involvement could threaten all that they have been fighting for. Will they still take a chance on love?Read More »

Review of ‘Not the marrying kind’ by Jae.

Ashley Gaines is a florist adamant to remain in the closet as she lives and works in a conservative small town. Her neighbour and bakery owner Sasha Peterson is a pansexual who likes to stay away from relationships. Living in a small place, they know each other but aren’t friends. When they are asked to help organising Leo and Holly’s wedding, they start sharing more time together and eventually realise that they are attracted to each other. But Ashley is determined to stay in the closet and Sasha isn’t the marrying kind anyway. Will they find their happily ever after?

This is book two of the ‘Fair Oaks’ series which started with ‘Perfect rhythm’. Even though this novel reads as standalone, many events refer to the previous book and it catches up with Leo and Holly’s relationship. Having said that, Ashley is not a likeable character in ‘Perfect rhythm’ so, if you read that first, it might take you long to warm to her in this new book.

To say that this is a slow-burn romance is an understatement as the author takes her time to develop both characters’ personalities and their budding relationship. This makes the story credible in redeeming Ashley’s hurtful actions of the past and in challenging Sasha’s assumptions about commitment. Even though Ashley’s self-inflicted repressed sexuality might feel alien to younger generations or people living in big cities, Jae’s description of the circumstances that force Ashley to remain in the closet will strike a chord with many readers. In this series, the author continues to challenge our views about sexuality by introducing a pansexual character, in addition to the asexual and non-binary characters that were featured in book one.

‘Not the marrying kind’ balances the above-mentioned serious issues of diverse sexual preferences and society’s pressure on LGBTQA+ individuals, with the sensual world of baking and flowers. The use of the hidden meaning of flowers and baking metaphors, in addition to a few playful scenes and wonderful slow-burn chemistry, introduces lightness and beauty to the story. As usual, Jae excels in bringing out the romance and depicting the characters’ intimacy with, for example, an excellent remake of a famous ‘Fried Green Tomatoes’ sequence plus a very steamy undressing scene. As a bonus, readers who enjoyed Jae’s ‘Damage control’ will have the chance to catch up with Grace and Lauren’s relationship.

Overall, an entertaining, sensual and fun slow-burn romance which raises deep issues of sexuality and coming out. 4.5 stars.

ARC provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

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Review of ‘Committed’ by Suzanne Falter.

This is book two of Ms. Falter’s ‘Oaktown Girls’ series following a group of lesbian friends in the San Francisco Bay area. ‘Committed’ resumes the story of Lizzy and Tenika, co-owners of ‘Driven’, a garage for women, and their respective girlfriends Kate and Delilah. A new couple is introduced in this book, Frankie, a police officer suffering from PTSD, and Sally, a psychic with bad luck with relationships who is trying to adapt to changes in her life.

All of the three couples’ stories share approximately the same amount of page space in the whole novel which revolves around the issue of commitment in relationships. It is written with seven different points of view (the three couples plus Kate’s former employer) but despite there are so many different characters, it’s not hard to follow each story. However, I recommend to read ‘Driven’ first as a lot of what happens in this book is based on the previous one.

The new romance story takes a long time to start and not much happens in this book. I would have liked to see more development of Frankie and Sally’s lives and of their relationship. As they aren’t together much in this book, it’s hard to feel the chemistry between them. Hopefully there will be more about them in the next one.

If you like novels with groups of friends with the chance to catch-up with the stories of all the couples involved, and you don’t mind committing (pun intended) to read a whole series, then this book is for you.

Overall, a good novel about commitment in relationships with a new romance on the side. 3.5 stars.

ARC provided by the author in exchange for an honest review.

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