Review of ‘Breaking down her walls’ by Erin Zak.

Julia Finch is a city girl used to constantly run away from her conflicted past and never settle anywhere. After dealing with her biological parents’ rejection she leaves Chicago towards the west. Her car breaks down somewhere in rural Colorado. Alone and without money, she gets a job as a ranch hand but when she meets the enigmatic and gorgeous ranch owner Elena Bennett, all bets are off. Will their attraction be enough to stop Julia from running?

This is an entertaining romance set in rural Colorado where the author grew up. Read More »

Review of ‘Lovebirds’ by Lisa Moreau.

Emily Wellington is the owner of a bird magazine who urgently needs a breakthrough article to keep it afloat. When she travels to Ojai, California to search for an elusive flock of Madagascar lovebirds, she wasn’t counting on crossing paths with gorgeous but infuriating pole dancer Sydney Cooper. As they get to know each other, their attraction is undeniable but Emily is engaged and Sidney is not interested in getting involved with anyone. Will they have their happily ever after?

This is a light, funny and entertaining read based on an original idea with the beautiful setting of Ojai valley in California. As she did in ‘The butterfly whisperer’, Ms. Moreau describes nature skillfully. I particularly loved her use of birds’ metaphors throughout the book. The dialogues are funny and witty, the main characters are lovable and their chemistry is spot on.

‘Lovebirds’ is mainly a romance with a bit of adventure at the side. I should warn romance fans that this book deals with infidelity, though it is mild. Additionally, some situations felt a bit forced and unrealistic but they suit the lightness of the plot. In order to enjoy this book, I suggest not to take it too seriously.

Overall, an ok read if you are a nature lover and you aren’t too bothered by mild infidelity. 3.5 stars.

ARC provided by Netgalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

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Review of ‘Autumn’s light’ by Aurora Rey.

This is book 4 of the ‘Cape End Romance’ series by this author featuring love stories for each season set in Provincetown, Massachusetts. As this novel presents characters from previous books in the series, especially book 3 ‘Spring’s Wake’, I recommend to read them in chronological order, or at least read book 3 first. The whole series features the beautiful landscape of Cape Cod and ‘Autumn’s light’ showcases the Portuguese heritage in Provincetown, particularly the fishermen who migrated to that area of Massachusetts a long time ago. The book captures the spirit of this tight community that keeps their traditions alive with Portuguese festivals and traditional food.

Mat Pero is a lobsterman (apparently, female lobster catchers are called like that) who comes from a established Portuguese family of fishermen. As her family is traditional Catholic and not completely supportive of her homosexuality, she prefers to keep her relationships casual and hidden from them. When she meets marine naturalist Graham Connor, her intention to keep things light don’t go according to plan. Will they have their happily ever after?

This is a butch-femme relationship that begins with insta-lust but is slow-burn in the romance department. Both main characters are well rounded and credible. Mat is the epitome of the dark and strong butch who, at the same time, wants to avoid family conflicts when dealing with her sexuality. Graham is a femme (paradoxically with such a masculine name) conflicted between her attraction for Mat, who offers her no commitment, and her desire to find a serious relationship. Their conflict is believable and makes the reader wonder how is in reality the coexistence between the traditional Catholic Portuguese and the liberal lesbian communities in Provincetown. Having said that, in my opinion, Mat’s family issues could have had a more developed resolution in the plot considering its importance.

The secondary characters are multi layered and complement the plot skillfully, kudos to the author for introducing a trans character and opening an interesting view into the world of fishing and marine habitat. However, there is an amount of paragraphs telling more than showing how the characters feel, which is a pet peeve of mine but it might not annoy other readers. My relatively low rating is because even though the story background was interesting, the romance didn’t appeal to me much.

Overall ‘Autumn’s light’ is an enjoyable read with the charming background of Provincetown. 3.5 stars.

ARC provided by Netgalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

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