Lesbian Fantasy Book

A great premise but the execution didn’t hold up

Lesbian Fantasy Book Review of ‘My dream woman’ by C.H. Clepitt

 

A really great premise but the execution didn’t hold up. This is my first novella by Clepitt. As a lesbian fantasy and paranormal fan, I was excited to read this. I really liked the premise and I thought it had so much potential. Unfortunately, I didn’t care for Clepitt’s story choices or her chosen pace for this novella.

The main story is about a woman named Andi who works two jobs just to pay the rent. Her self-esteem is at an all-time low with a mother who is constantly putting her down. But when Andi dreams, she becomes a sword-wielding warrior with all the confidence in the world. When Andi meets another warrior woman in her dreams but then also in real life, Andi realizes her dream world might have real-life consequences. Read More »

This story got me in the palm of its hand

Lesbian Book Review of ‘In the palm’ by Elna Holst.

I’ve absolutely loved this book, it’s got everything in one very well-written package: adventure, mystery, and romance. The story is a very loose retelling of Robinson Crusoe, starting with a punch. A woman is stranded in an isolated island with no recollection of who she is and how she got there and with the only certainty that, if she wants to survive, she needs to amputate one of her hands.

As the story develops, the main character and the reader are slowly clued on the real identity and the mystery surrounding her. Read More »

‘In the palm’ won’t leave you stranded.

Review of ‘In the palm’ by Elna Holst.

This was a good read. I have wanted to read something by Holst for a while. When I saw she had written a lesfic novella about being stranded on a deserted island, I knew chances were good I would enjoy this. I’m not sure what it is but I always enjoy reading books and watching movies about people surviving on an island. I’m glad this held up to my expectations and I was definitely entertained.

The story is about a woman who wakes up on an island in the middle of nowhere. She has no idea how she arrived or even what her name is, but she does know she needs to cut her hand off if she is going to survive. This it, that’s all I’m going to say. Frankly, the beginning immediately captured my attention and I could not put this novella down. And while it is a novella, it feels like a good length. It doesn’t have that rushed feeling; it felt like a full and satisfying story.
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‘In the silences’ by Rachel Gold gets your mind working…

This was a really good YA book. As I’ve mentioned multiple times I can be up and down when it comes to YA books but Gold writes really well. This is the third book I have read by her and all of them have been quality reads. Gold writes about topics that other authors tend to shy away from. In this book Gold takes on race, gender, and sexuality. Each time I read one of her books I walk away feeling like I learned something new which I always appreciate.

This book covers about three years in two teenager’s lives. Kaz is struggling with their gender while Aisha has to deal with systematic racism after moving to a town this is mostly white. These two teenagers click and become best friends instantly. Kaz knows they are falling for Aisha hard, but can Aisha accept how Kaz sees their own gender? And with racism affecting Aisha’s schooling, will she be around long enough for Kaz to find out?

This is one of those books that definitely messed with my emotions. I went from crying one minute, to being so mad I was steaming the next. And while some of this book was hard to read because you know it’s a fiction book based on facts, there were still plenty of uplifting moments. This is one of those YA books that should really be in school libraries but is also a book adults should read. Even with me talking many sociology classes including gender studies when I was in college, terms and how we understand gender has really changed in the past few years. I feel like I’m coming away with a better understanding of how some genderqueer people feel about themselves. And while I know there is plenty of racism still alive in 2019, you just have to turn on the TV to know it, this book made me think about things I just never would have considered as a white person.

While there are some tough parts to read in this book, there is a sweet G-rated YA romance. I thought Kaz and Aisha were just perfectly adorable together. I loved how much they uplifted and fought for each other. Kaz was a little warrior and I just loved that about them. And while not everything was wrapped up in a neat little bow, I enjoyed how the ending of the book made me feel.

This is one of those books that I just think people should read. Like I mentioned before I think Gold writes books that are important. She knows how to leave an impact on you while getting your mind working. That is the sign of a good book and a good author in my opinion.

An ARC was given to me for an honest review.

Review of ‘Recipe for love’ by Aurora Rey.

New Yorker hotshot chef Drew Davis has a clear professional goal to become a restaurant head chef as soon as possible. She gets the opportunity she was waiting for in a farm-to-table establishment in upstate New York. Apart from the inconvenience of having to leave her beloved city life to move to a rural area, Drew has to deal with local farmer Hannah Little who is as beautiful as obstinate and isn’t impressed by the fancy city chef. As they are forced to work together to make the restaurant a success, they both discover many things in common and a brewing mutual attraction. But Drew is only in upstate New York temporarily and will be back to NYC at the first opportunity to advance her professional career, or is she?

This is a slow-burn romance which will be appreciated especially by gourmet readers. Food is at the forefront of the story, with a particular focus on farm-produced ingredients. A farm-to-table restaurant aims to source most of the ingredients from local food producers, an apparently simple concept which presents a few challenges. Ms. Rey describes thoroughly the hard work involved in farming, the diverse types of products and the different nature cycles. As these descriptions take a big part of the book, people interested in farming, food produce and sustainability will enjoy the story much better than the rest. I personally found that there was too much detail in these aspects that distracted me from the main story.

In this novel, Ms. Rey uses contrasts expertly: femme-butch, white-biracial, countryside-city, and even including a feminine farmer character, which seems contradictory in itself. But beyond these disparities, there is an ample common ground; the appreciation of good food, the importance of family and the search of long-lasting love. The romance part of the plot is well written, and the characters’ relationship is built slowly from a strong initial antagonism that eventually changes into attraction. The author gets the butch-femme dynamic spot-on, especially in the sex scenes which, nevertheless, present a hot role reversal. My main criticism is that the characters’ main conflict could have been solved much easier with better communication.

Overall, a good butch-femme romance which will be appreciated especially by gourmet readers. 3.5 stars.

ARC provided by the publisher and Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

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Review of ‘Committed’ by Suzanne Falter.

This is book two of Ms. Falter’s ‘Oaktown Girls’ series following a group of lesbian friends in the San Francisco Bay area. ‘Committed’ resumes the story of Lizzy and Tenika, co-owners of ‘Driven’, a garage for women, and their respective girlfriends Kate and Delilah. A new couple is introduced in this book, Frankie, a police officer suffering from PTSD, and Sally, a psychic with bad luck with relationships who is trying to adapt to changes in her life.

All of the three couples’ stories share approximately the same amount of page space in the whole novel which revolves around the issue of commitment in relationships. It is written with seven different points of view (the three couples plus Kate’s former employer) but despite there are so many different characters, it’s not hard to follow each story. However, I recommend to read ‘Driven’ first as a lot of what happens in this book is based on the previous one.

The new romance story takes a long time to start and not much happens in this book. I would have liked to see more development of Frankie and Sally’s lives and of their relationship. As they aren’t together much in this book, it’s hard to feel the chemistry between them. Hopefully there will be more about them in the next one.

If you like novels with groups of friends with the chance to catch-up with the stories of all the couples involved, and you don’t mind committing (pun intended) to read a whole series, then this book is for you.

Overall, a good novel about commitment in relationships with a new romance on the side. 3.5 stars.

ARC provided by the author in exchange for an honest review.

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