Struggling to connect with ‘Wavering convictions’.

Lesbian Book Review of ‘Wavering convictions’ by Erin Dutton.

I have to say I was a bit disappointed by this lesbian book. It wasn’t a badly written book or anything, I just found myself struggling to connect to it. I like Dutton, I’ve enjoyed most of the books I’ve read of hers and I was actually looking forward to this. To be honest, this almost didn’t feel like a Dutton book, but that’s just my opinion since something felt a little off here.

I actually thought this book had an interesting premise. Two women that meet and share a few sparks only to find they are connected through a crime. I can’t really recall reading a lesfic book with a premise like this before so I have to give Dutton credit for that. I’m just disappointed that it didn’t end up working for me. Actually, the book almost made me feel uncomfortable. I didn’t like the feeling I got while reading this, and one thing I can say about Dutton is she is normally a very comfortable author. This is one of the reasons why this book didn’t really feel like it was one of hers.Read More »

Not Alone in praising Noyes

Review of ‘Alone’ by EJ Noyes

Uff, this one was intense!

I just need to start at the beginning of my experience reading this novel. Literally, as I read the first sentence, I smiled. Yep, happy sigh. First person POV, you have become my favorite. First person POV written by EJ Noyes, I love you! Ms. Noyes, at the risk of sounding like a lunatic to you (again), you singlehandedly are responsible for my first person POV obsession. Your first person POV is simply genius. I’ve read other books written in first person, but none that resonate with me like when written by this author.

Did I mention my smile right? Well, that’s the last time I did until later, later in the book. This is Celeste Thorne’s first-person POV recount of her participation on a psychological study. The goal is for her to endure four years in close to complete isolation from human contact. The story begins after the third year, when suddenly Olivia Soldano, a lost hiker, appears on the edge of the compound. Suddenly Celeste must readjust to this person who is simply everything she ever wanted. The problem is that after such isolation, Celeste’s feelings are in disarray and she struggles to determine what is real and what is part of an elaborate lie.Read More »

In ‘The pet boutique’ the dog steals the show.

Review of ‘The pet boutique’ by Suzie Carr.

Taylor Henshaw is an accomplished bestselling author suffering from writer’s block. To help her find her writing mojo again, her editor sends her to work in a pet shop that needs serious building renovations. While working on the project, Taylor meets Lexie Tanner, an attractive photographer and pet shop manager. As the refurbishment project progresses, Taylor and Lexie explore their budding attraction, but Taylor is a complicated woman dealing with bereavement and unsolved issues from her past. Will they have a happily ever after?

This is a slow-burn romance with the background of a building renovation and a cute dog as a co-lead. ‘The pet boutique’ refurbishment progresses as Taylor rebuilds her life and heals her old wounds. Both women leads are multi-layered and believable, their chemistry is built slowly but surely with the help of Cashmere, the dog, who acts as a facilitator in their relationship. Ms. Carr knows how to bring a dog character to life, to showcase their bonding with humans, their ability to support their masters in times of need and to understand the heartbreak of losing a pet.Read More »

Review of ‘Alone’ by E.J. Noyes.

Celeste Thorne is taking part in a scientific experiment that involves solitary confinement for four years with a final prize of half a million dollars. More than three years into the study, she finds a woman lurking in the border of her compound. Olivia Soldano is beautiful, caring and enigmatic but her sole presence in the house breaks the rules of the experiment and ultimately, can Celeste trust her?

Oh well… E.J. Noyes cannot stop surprising her readers, can she? ‘Alone’ is a book hard to categorise: it’s a game of contrasts. It’s dark but also optimistic, it’s about solitude but features a couple, it’s unsettling but, at the same time, hopeful. If you are acquainted with Ms. Noyes’s work, you will recognise the imprints of her style that readers have learned to love. Her books are always written in first person usually from the point of view of a broken woman with her co-lead presented as a flawed but righteous rescuer. What I consider outstanding is that, despite this apparent repetition, the stories have very different settings (war zone, corporate world, sports and now a psychological experiment) that make them all very distinctive, original and, at the same time, realistic.Read More »

A ‘Perfect Match’ made in Japan.

Review of ‘Perfect Match Book One’ by Mildred Gail Digby.

This was different from the usual romance books I get to read. Although still a medical romance, the setting made it seem far from what we are used to.

Megan Maier is a pediatrician returning to work after losing her partner the previous year in an unfortunate accident. She is taken by Syler Terada, a pediatric surgeon with dashing, androgynous looks. The attraction is immediate and was mildly disappointing since it happened on the heels of Megan’s panic attack. However, the rest of the interactions are great and not rushed, so overall the romance was done very well.

As mentioned above, the singular element in the book is the Japan setting. I was not sure initially where they were as it was only clear that Megan had been in Thailand the previous year. I also could not tell which language they were referencing. The narration is obviously in English, but there are Japanese words sprinkled throughout the story. The author, later on, mentions that the characters were speaking Japanese at times and even mentions how English and German are other languages spoken at the hospital. I enjoy other languages, wanted to see how Japan’s medicine was portrayed and certainly, the author showcased her knowledge of Japanese, but these words were a reading disruption for me as I did not have a clear translation readily available for many of them and I frequently found myself searching for definitions on the internet.Read More »

‘My Lady Lipstick’ by Karin Kallmaker is a glossy & smooth read.

I had not read a Kallmaker book since 2016, so I was excited to get my hands on this one. While I have not read a ton of Kallmaker’s works, every book I have read I have enjoyed. She has been around the lesfic world for a long time and it shows in how well she writes. I’m happy to say this was another enjoyable romance.

Paris is an author who writes bodes rippers under the penname Anita Topaz. Paris suffers from really bad anxiety so she has never made any public appearances. In fact, she is so off the grid that only a few trusted people know her secret. When her publishing house is bought by a new company, Paris is facing pressure to become the face behind her books. Diana is in Massachusetts, undercover, at an acting company. She travels the world looking for items she believes should be returned to their rightful owners or museums. When she finds out Paris’ publishing house is now owned by a man that has such an artifact, she hatches a scheme to recover it. Will Diana go through with her plans even if her feelings for Paris evolve?

This book had a really nice feel to it. A little bit of light humor, warmth, but also tackled the subject of anxiety quite well. I think whenever authors can accurately portray something that is real to us as readers, it always impresses me. I’ve dealt with panic attacks when I was younger and still have to fight anxiety on occasion. I’m content with how she approached this topic. It was realistic, but not heavy; this is a lighthearted romance after all.
I was also really happy with the pace of the book. I would say the book is slightly longer than average, but it never really lagged for me. I never felt bored, and really enjoyed the actual concept of the book. While we may have read similar parts before in other books, the story, on the whole, was different enough that it felt new to me.

When it came to the romance, at first I thought maybe the characters had jumped into bed a little fast. But with how the rest of the story unfolded, I was okay with it. There was no rushing to say “I love you”. I actually really appreciate that as it seems to happen too often lately in lesfic romances. The romance instead felt like it progressed really organically. Not including the one angsty part, I actually felt the romance was one of the more realistic romances I have read in a while. My only one complaint, I just wish there was a tad more chemistry between the main characters. I absolutely believed the attraction; it just needs a tad more spark.

This was absolutely the right romance at the right time for me. I enjoyed this read and I hope others do as much as I did. If you are a Kallmaker fan, I believe you will be happy with this read. Also, I want to mention, Lisa from ‘Warming Trend’ was a secondary character in this book. If you enjoyed that book, it might be another reason to pick this one up.

An ARC was given to me by Bella, for an honest review.