Lesbian Futuristic Book

A very good Lesbian Futuristic Book

Lesbian Futuristic Book Review of ‘Chosen’ by Brey Willows

 

This was a good lesbian futuristic book that I enjoyed reading. This is the first book that Willows has released that is not part of her ‘Afterlife Inc.’ series. While I really liked that series, I was excited to see what new direction Willows would go in. While ‘Afterlife’ was urban fantasy, I would put this book in the post-apocalyptic category. Willows writes books in categories I love to read so it makes me a happy camper.

In a little over 80 years, the world has been ravaged by another world war and the climate is heating up faster than anyone could predict. While some cities are underwater, others have turned into deserts. The population has been decimated by natural disasters and disease. There are fewer and fewer good places left to live. Devin, a geologist, and Karissa, a scientist, find themselves being picked up by a military convoy at their homes. They are forced into the truck with other scientists not knowing where they are being taken. All they know is they are chosen by the government for something. Before they can even get answers, their convoy is attacked by raiders. As Devin and Karissa try to survive, they can’t help but grow closer. And when they find out why they are called the ‘Chosen’, they realize their lives will never be the same. Read More »

Lesbian Sci-fi Book Review

A really entertaining read

Lesbian Sci-fi Book Review ‘Across the dark horizon’ by Tagan Shepard

 

3.75 Stars. This was a really entertaining read. This is the third book by Shepard and while I enjoyed her first two books a little more, this was still a fun read. I’m a big sci-fi fan so I have to say that the fact Shepard left her romantic-dramas behind to take us to the moon instead was really appreciated. I love authors that can write in multiple genres and this fact makes me even more excited to see where she might take us next.

While I would put the sci-fi tag on this book, it really is light sci-fi, in fact, futuristic might be the better name for this. The idea of this book is not really so far out there. I could actually see something similar happening in another ten to twenty years. I think because of this you don’t have to be a sci-fi fan to enjoy this. I would recommend this one to lesfic readers in general.Read More »

Lesbian Book Review

A great story of mature lesbian love

Lesbian Book Review of ‘This Foreign Affair’ by Harper Bliss

Zoey Das is a journalist with her own television show in Australia. She is still finding her footing even six months after her partner of 16 years broke off the relationship. A serendipitous event puts Camille Rousseau, a scientist, in her path and the connection is immediate. The only problem is Camille is a week away from returning home, all the way in Paris, France. The holiday fling that feels like so much more may just be what Zoey needs to start a new chapter in her life.

This was a very good story. The mains are likable, very mature characters as should be at close to 50 years old. The book is told in first person from Zoey’s POV. Have I mentioned I love first person POV? Because I do!Read More »

Not Alone in praising Noyes

Review of ‘Alone’ by EJ Noyes

Uff, this one was intense!

I just need to start at the beginning of my experience reading this novel. Literally, as I read the first sentence, I smiled. Yep, happy sigh. First person POV, you have become my favorite. First person POV written by EJ Noyes, I love you! Ms. Noyes, at the risk of sounding like a lunatic to you (again), you singlehandedly are responsible for my first person POV obsession. Your first person POV is simply genius. I’ve read other books written in first person, but none that resonate with me like when written by this author.

Did I mention my smile right? Well, that’s the last time I did until later, later in the book. This is Celeste Thorne’s first-person POV recount of her participation on a psychological study. The goal is for her to endure four years in close to complete isolation from human contact. The story begins after the third year, when suddenly Olivia Soldano, a lost hiker, appears on the edge of the compound. Suddenly Celeste must readjust to this person who is simply everything she ever wanted. The problem is that after such isolation, Celeste’s feelings are in disarray and she struggles to determine what is real and what is part of an elaborate lie.Read More »

Review of ‘Alone’ by E.J. Noyes.

Celeste Thorne is taking part in a scientific experiment that involves solitary confinement for four years with a final prize of half a million dollars. More than three years into the study, she finds a woman lurking in the border of her compound. Olivia Soldano is beautiful, caring and enigmatic but her sole presence in the house breaks the rules of the experiment and ultimately, can Celeste trust her?

Oh well… E.J. Noyes cannot stop surprising her readers, can she? ‘Alone’ is a book hard to categorise: it’s a game of contrasts. It’s dark but also optimistic, it’s about solitude but features a couple, it’s unsettling but, at the same time, hopeful. If you are acquainted with Ms. Noyes’s work, you will recognise the imprints of her style that readers have learned to love. Her books are always written in first person usually from the point of view of a broken woman with her co-lead presented as a flawed but righteous rescuer. What I consider outstanding is that, despite this apparent repetition, the stories have very different settings (war zone, corporate world, sports and now a psychological experiment) that make them all very distinctive, original and, at the same time, realistic.Read More »

Review of ‘Uninvited’ by Jane C. Esther.

This was a different read. I enjoyed Esther’s debut book, but I have to admit I didn’t care for this one as much. It’s sort of one of those “what the heck did I just read?” kind of books. I like weird and I love sci-fi, this just was not what I was expecting.

The story is about Aerin, who has some kind of sensory attack while at a lake in upstate New York. She has no idea what happened to her but she knows she is different now. Aerin doesn’t want to risk going to a hospital so she seeks out a doctor/scientist for help. The problem is the doctor is Olivia, Aerin’s ex-girlfriend and childhood best friend. Can they keep the memories of the past at bay to find out what is wrong with Aerin?

For the most part, this book is what I would consider sci-fi lite. It actually might not be a bad choice for someone who wants to stick their toe in sci-fi but is a little reluctant. However, that’s not to say that this book is not weird. And I did feel it became a little convoluted towards the end. It almost felt like Esther was trying to cram too much in and my head was spinning a bit. Which is odd considering this is a shorter book that could have been made longer and is the start to a series (‘The portal’).

This leads me to a complaint, I hated how the book just ended. It didn’t even feel like a cliffhanger (although it is) but more like part of the book’s end is just missing. I hate when books end like that, drives me nuts. I did not realize when I grabbed this book that it was a series with no current ending. Knowing what I know now, half of me wonders if I would have still read this, but then the other half says ‘hey its lesfic sci-fi’, of course, I still would have read it.

Besides the annoying ending my biggest issues were the characters. I really struggled. I thought that Aerin was sort of okay. It was hard to connect to her because I could not tell if she was who she normally was or if she changed because of what happened to her in the lake. Is this her real personality? It made me feel disconnected to her so I felt a little indifferent instead. Olivia, on the other hand, was, in my opinion, awful. She was just nasty to Aerin and was still nasty with only a few chapters left to go. There was no time for character redemption. She was stuck on something that happened when she was sixteen and put too much anger on another child, it just didn’t make sense. All of her feelings were not invalid, but they sure should not have taken a whole book to get over. Maybe her character will grow in the next book, but something big needs to change or I will never believe in a possible romantic connection between the two mains.

Even though this was a weird premise, it had potential. I’m just such a character-driven reader that the characters messed up too much of the book for me. This is one of those books I can’t recommend, but I won’t say stay away either. With as much as I struggled with this, I will still probably read the next book since I want an ending. I’m hoping Esther can really turn things around in the next installment. 3 stars.

An ARC was given to me for an honest review.