Review of ‘The London of us’ by Clare Lydon.

This is book 4 in the ‘London romance’ series. It can be read as a standalone novel though I recommend to read them all if you like lesbian romances with a British feel. As in the previous books, London is at the background of a beautiful love story.

Alice Di Santo has a comfortable life. A job that she enjoys, great friends, supportive family and a lovely boyfriend. Even her social media life is thriving as a co-star in an increasingly popular YouTube channel. But lately she feels that something is missing in her life soon discovering her growing attraction for her friend Rachel, a sexy and very lesbian chef. Surely this is a passing crush, or is it?

‘The London of us’ is as much a romance as a coming out story. Ms. Lydon wisely chose to write it in first person from Alice point of view getting us into her headspace as she deals with her first ever attraction to a woman. The book starts with a bang and keeps the momentum with humour and wittiness that puts a smile on your face. Those of us who have experienced the coming out process know that it’s not an easy path and Ms. Lydon showcases this but the angst, while realistic, never takes the lightness of her writing style. As a matter of fact, Alice’s coming out scene with her parents is the funniest I’ve read in lesfic. All the characters – mains and secondary – are well portrayed and the intimate scenes are hot, highlighting the chemistry between the main leads.

Overall, a very good addition to this successful series. Great read for romance fans. 4 stars.

ARC provided by the author in exchange for an honest review.

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Review of ‘Love at Cooper’s Creek’ by Missouri Vaun.

When Shaw Daily escapes San Francisco to her grandparents’ town of Cooper’s Creek to decompress from the stress of her corporate career, she finds there more than she bargained for. In the rural town she meets Kate Elkins, a beautiful school teacher in a sabbatical year to care for her aging mother. Along with love, Shaw discovers unexpected family secrets. Will Shaw be able to make peace with her past and take her budding relationship with Kate to the next level?

This book goes beyond the typical sweet romance and explores difficult subjects such as life choices, bereavement, aging and dementia. The author touches all these issues with tact and, at the same time, keeps our focus on the beautiful love story. The chemistry between the mains, the multi layered secondary characters and the well structured plot contribute towards a very pleasant read.

Overall, a very well written and sweet romance. 5 stars.

ARC provided by Netgalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

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Review of ‘A heart to call home’ by Jeannie Levig.

A terrible tragedy left teenagers Dakota Scott and Jessie Weldon in opposite sides of a family feud. But after meeting again as adults they are both unable to deny their mutual attraction. Can they explore their feelings further or accept that their past history is an insurmountable obstacle?

This book’s main premise is a difficult starting point for a romance. Can love be built over the flimsy foundations of pain and mistrust, even when events happened many years ago? In ‘A heart to call home’ somehow Ms. Levig does the trick. As Dakota and Jessie get to know each other, they also discover things about themselves which change them profoundly. The main characters embark on a soul searching journey which is moving, poignant and sometimes heart-breaking. The reader joins this emotional rollercoaster suffering and enjoying along with the characters. It is one hell of a ride. My only issue about this book is that the ending seems too abrupt and would have benefited from a bit more development. Despite this, it is a very recommendable read.

Overall, an emotional, compelling romance. 4.5 stars

ARC provided by Netgalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

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