Lesbian fantasy crime book

Going Wild with this Lesbian Fantasy Crime Book

Lesbian Fantasy Crime Book Review of ‘Wild’ by Meghan O’Brien

I chose O’Brien’s ‘Wild’ continuing with my new year resolution to read more lesbian books out of my comfort zone. Thanks, Tere for the recommendation! I’m so glad I decided to finally take the plunge and read it. It’s true that it deals with a vicious serial killer and there are violence and some disturbing content which normally are triggers for me, but the author handles them with finesse.

Selene Rhodes is a reclusive designer who hides a secret, not only she can shift to any other animal shape but also every full moon she transforms into a werewolf without a human conscience. So, for her, any romantic involvement is ruled out. Forensic pathologist Eve Thomas is brilliant at her profession but unlucky in love. When she meets Selene, who helps her after an attack, they cannot help but feel strongly drawn to each other. But Selene keeps secrets and Eve cannot trust her. Can Selene open up to Eve and help her catch a dangerous serial killer?Read More »

Lesbian Crime Book

No Good Reason to not read this lesbian crime book

Lesbian Crime Book Review of ‘No Good Reason’ by Cari Hunter

 

Why didn’t anyone recommend this book to me? 😉 Ok, ok, several people did. I was too darn stubborn and wanted to save it for a rainy day. I may have to dive into the three and a half (there is a short story too) lesbian crime book series right away.

This is the story of Sanne Jensen, a British detective that stumbles upon a kidnapping victim, sending her department into a manhunt. The manhunt turns frantic as another victim is discovered. In the meantime, Sanne’s longtime friend, Dr. Meg Fielding helps her try to keep some sanity through the case while trying to figure out the state of their relationship.

Can the detectives beat the clock and save the other victim before it is too late?Read More »

Definitely a matter of execution

Lesbian Book Review of ‘You matter’ by Jazzy Mitchell.

 

Chrissy Kramer is used to rejection. When she got pregnant as a teenager, her parents kicked her out and she was left alone with her baby. Now, fifteen years later, she works as a paralegal for Reggie Esposito, a senior law partner at a big Boston law firm and her son Ben is becoming a wonderful young man. When a disgruntled former client attempts to kill her boss, Chrissy saves her life but gets hurt in the process. As Chrissy and Ben stay at Reggie’s house to help with her recovery, both women decide to embark in a relationship in which they’ll both have to decide what really matters.

This novel has the uplifting premise that every person matters despite their own beliefs that they might not make a difference. Chrissy is a character with very low self-esteem, justified by how her parents rejected her when she got pregnant as a teenager. It’s natural that she feels insecure about relationships, and the book explores her fears and hesitancy towards a romantic entanglement. She sees Reggie as everything she feels she cannot be, elegant, classy and successful. Reggie, on the other hand, sees Chrissy for who she is, a dedicated mother, a hard worker, and a beautiful woman.Read More »

You won’t fall hard for ‘Hard Fall’

Lesbian Book Review of ‘Hard Fall: A McStone and Martinelli Thriller’ by Pascal Scott

San Francisco, 1989. The dead body of Emily Bryson, a university student and part-time exotic dancer, appears on a beach. The police rule it as a suicide but her partner, K. M. “Stone” McStone, has doubts about it. She enlists amateur private investigator Zoe Martinelli to find out the truth.

‘Hard fall’ presents a good depiction of LGBT life in San Francisco in the tumultuous 1980s troubled by AIDS and homophobia. The book also explores different issues such as women sexuality, gun control, bereavement, alcoholism, philosophy, and psychology. The main characters, Stone and Zoe, are well-written and multilayered, and Stone struggles with bereavement and alcohol are realistic and believable.Read More »

Struggling to connect with ‘Wavering convictions’.

Lesbian Book Review of ‘Wavering convictions’ by Erin Dutton.

I have to say I was a bit disappointed by this lesbian book. It wasn’t a badly written book or anything, I just found myself struggling to connect to it. I like Dutton, I’ve enjoyed most of the books I’ve read of hers and I was actually looking forward to this. To be honest, this almost didn’t feel like a Dutton book, but that’s just my opinion since something felt a little off here.

I actually thought this book had an interesting premise. Two women that meet and share a few sparks only to find they are connected through a crime. I can’t really recall reading a lesfic book with a premise like this before so I have to give Dutton credit for that. I’m just disappointed that it didn’t end up working for me. Actually, the book almost made me feel uncomfortable. I didn’t like the feeling I got while reading this, and one thing I can say about Dutton is she is normally a very comfortable author. This is one of the reasons why this book didn’t really feel like it was one of hers.Read More »

I need more Cash in my life.

Review of ‘Cash and the sorority girl’ by Ashley Bartlett.

4.50 Stars. I just love this series. This is the third book in the series and my favorite so far. I just didn’t want to put this book down. I was actually mad when I had to stop reading to eat dinner. Food, who cares about food when a good book is in front of you. If you are new to the series, I highly recommend reading these books in order.

I know having a drug dealer for a main character can put some people off from reading this. I had no idea what to expect when I picked the first book up. I was not disappointed for a second and I hope other people won’t let this series pass them by.

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